Diamond Jewellery > Engagement Rings

Engagement Rings
Engagement Rings

Engagement Rings


For over hundred's of years, engagement rings for women have been a staple part of any proposal. They are a symbol of love and dedication from a man to a woman. More recently, to reflect a more equal society, engagement rings have become popular for men too. They're also often worn by both partners in a relationship, not just those who have been proposed to.

There is a plethora of different types of diamond ring designs, each suited to a different taste. Perhaps the only "problem" in buying a diamond ring is, given the extensive range of styles, deciding which style best appeals to you. This is a "problem" though that many people would love to have.

One of the most important steps in buying an engagement ring is determining your ring type. We show you a variety of engagement ring styles from classic solitaires to modern tension rings. Whether you are looking for a modest, traditional ring or something flashier, we have an informative and comprehensive guide on the ring type just for you to view from.

The traditional engagement ring is made of two parts: a gold or platinum setting and a solitaire diamond. We show you a bevy of options which includes three stone engagement rings, engagement rings with side stones, and vintage engagement rings. Start by selecting a setting type that fits the ring style you are looking for, and then focus on customizing the diamond quality and size to fit within your budget. If you need help finding her ring size, you can use our online Ring Size guide.

Choose The Perfect Engagement Ring?


In the past, the typical investment for an engagement ring would typically be two to three months gross salary, but there is really no precise amount to spend. We advise you to look for a high quality ring that fits your style and budget. Our informative guide will help you select the best engagement ring setting, and decide on the right balance of diamond quality and size.

Ring Setting


There are many different ring settings to choose from when deciding on an engagement ring. Each setting type has unique properties that enhance the beauty of the diamonds.

The style and setting of the engagement ring's band is just as important as the stone that will be set on it. The ring should reflect her personal style: you may want to choose something that matches the jewellery she already wears.

It should also suit the shape of her fingers. As a general rule, smaller rings are more appropriate for younger people, while larger rings look best on mature hands. Rings with wide, horizontal stylings are well-suited to long, slender fingers, while shorter fingers call for more vertical designs. An elongated ring can also flatter more generously-proportioned hands.

Channel Set - Channel set gemstones are placed into a metal channel. The gemstones flow in a continuous row, because no metal is used to separate them.

Bezel Set - Diamonds and other gems are held in a bezel setting by a metal rim that encircles the sides of the stone and extends slightly above it.

Prong Set - A prong setting, sometimes called a claw setting, is the most commonly used gemstone setting and is especially popular to display solitaire engagement rings

Pave Set - Made up of lots of small gemstones, diamonds are often set closely together. The gems are separated and held in place by little beads of the setting metal. The result is what looks like a continuous surface of diamonds or other gems.

See our Setting Types guide for more information on setting types.


Metal Types


When it comes to selecting the right metal type for your engagement ring, consider which metal type your partner tends to wear regularly. An engagement ring is traditionally made from gold, although it doesn't necessarily need to be gold in color: White gold is just as popular for its understated, elegant appearance. Rose gold is also very attractive and lends the ring a unique look - or for an engagement ring that almost seems to glow from within, consider platinum.

The main components to remember about selecting 10k gold are that it is the lightest of the metal types and is mixed with the most alloy percentages; therefore it is the least expensive. The main features of 14k gold is that it is the most popular choice for fine jewellery and is 58.3% pure gold with the rest comprised of alloys. 18k gold is the softest of the metal types because it is the highest percentage of pure gold compared to the others. It is 75% pure gold with 25% alloys.

Platinum has a beautiful white finish and is the heaviest of all the metal types. It has a 950 mark which means it is 95% pure platinum combined with alloys. Platinum costs more, but has a luxurious reputation and greater longevity than gold or silver.

Selecting A Center Diamond


When choosing the best diamond for your engagement ring, you should consider the 4Cs, also certification, cost and shape. These are universally accepted characteristics by which all diamonds are graded. They are: cut, color, clarity, and carat weight of a diamond. By changing any of the characteristics, you can dramatically affect the diamond's value, all other factors being equal.

For a customized engagement ring, start by choosing the engagement ring styles you think she'll love and then focus on finding a beautiful, certified center diamond. With some reputable jewellers's diamond ring collection, you have the option to customize both the side stones and center diamond independently.

White (colorless) diamonds are the traditional choice for the stone, but again you should feel free to let your own instincts - and her style - influence the final decision. Pink diamonds, prized for their rarity, make an exceptional choice for a ring with a difference.

Carat - A diamond's weight is measured in carats; the larger a diamond the more rare.

Cut - A well cut or faceted diamond, scintillates with light, offering the greatest brilliance and value.

Color - Diamonds are graded by color, starting at D and moving through to Z, with D being the most colorless.

Clarity - The greater a diamond's clarity, the more brilliant, valuable and rare it is.

Certification - A diamond grading report is a quality certification from an independent gem laboratory.

Cost - It is important to buy a diamond that offers the best features but with a good mix of the first 4Cs.

Shape - The shape and dimensions of a diamond play a key role in its appearance in a ring.


Ring Styles


View Selection Of Engagement Rings



    Solitaire Engagement Ring

    Solitaire Engagement Ring

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    Solitaire Engagement Ring

    Solitaire Engagement Ring

    Solitaire Accent (Side Stones) Ring

    Solitaire Accent (Side Stones) Ring

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    Solitaire Accent (Side Stones) Ring

    Solitaire Accent (Side Stones) Ring

    Pave Engagement Ring

    Pave Engagement Ring

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    Pave Engagement Ring

    Pave Engagement Ring

    Channel Set Engagement Ring

    Channel Set Engagement Ring

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    Channel Set Engagement Ring

    Channel Set Engagement Ring

    Tension Set Engagement Ring

    Tension Set Engagement Ring

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    Tension Set Engagement Ring

    Tension Set Engagement Ring

    Halo Engagement Ring

    Halo Engagement Ring

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    Halo Engagement Ring

    Halo Engagement Ring

    Halo Accent Engagement Ring

    Halo Accent Engagement Ring

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    Halo Accent Engagement Ring

    Halo Accent Engagement Ring

    Vintage Engagement Ring

    Vintage Engagement Ring

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    Vintage Engagement Ring

    Vintage Engagement Ring

    Wedding Set Ring

    Wedding Set Ring

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    Wedding Set Ring

    Wedding Set Ring

    Three-Stone Engagement Ring

    Three-Stone Engagement Ring

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    Three-Stone Engagement Ring

    Three-Stone Engagement Ring

    Bezel Engagement Ring

    Bezel Engagement Ring

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    Bezel Engagement Ring

    Bezel Engagement Ring

    Bar Setting Engagement Ring

    Bar Setting Engagement Ring

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    Bar Setting Engagement Ring

    Bar Setting Engagement Ring

    Cathedral Setting Engagement Ring

    Cathedral Setting Engagement Ring

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    Cathedral Setting Engagement Ring

    Cathedral Setting Engagement Ring

    Cluster Setting Engagement Ring

    Cluster Setting Engagement Ring

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    Cluster Setting Engagement Ring

    Cluster Setting Engagement Ring

    Split Shank Engagement Ring

    Split Shank Engagement Ring

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    Split Shank Engagement Ring

    Split Shank Engagement Ring







Solitaire Engagement Ring


A solitaire ring setting features a single stone, typically a diamond with a plain mounting (usually four or six prongs). Each tiny metal claw grips the diamond to hold it tightly in place. Prongs can be pointed, rounded, flat or V-shaped. Solitaires are one of the most popular engagement ring settings. Their appeal is in their elegance, simplicity, and timelessness. Solitaire engagement rings come in a variety of sizes and styles. Some have narrower bands which have the effect of making a smaller diamond appear larger, and compliment small fingers. Others have thicker bands which allow for more options in the way the diamond is set. Many solitaire rings have ring guards (or rings wraps) which frame the center diamond, making it appear more prominent. The most popular stone shapes for solitaire rings include round, princess, emerald, marquise cushion, heart, pear and oval.

A solitaire setting, is a beautiful choice for those with a simple and elegant style. The sleek design and uncomplicated beauty is a stunning compliment to every outfit and occasion. Diamonds attract attention in a solitaire setting, as there are no additional stones or ornate elements to distract from the center stone. With a prong solitaire setting, there's minimal metal, meaning there's more diamond to see and more light to pass through, thus adding to the diamond's brilliance. Solitaire settings are an excellent match for any diamond shape because of their classic design and secure support. The prongs will hold the diamond, no matter its size or cut style.

Pros and Cons of a Solitaire Setting


In addition to choosing a setting that matches the style of your significant other, you want to ensure it fits their lifestyle and is relatively easy to maintain. Review the pros and cons of a solitaire setting below before making your final decision:

Pros


• Elevates the diamond, making it more prominent and noticeable.

• Allows a significant amount of light to pass through the diamond, increasing its brilliance and fire.

• Complements and supports a variety of Diamond Shapes and sizes.

• Easy to maintain and clean.

• Provides a classic, timeless look.

Cons


• Can snag on furniture, clothing and other materials, especially if the diamond is high set (a lower set prong may be best for wearers with an active lifestyle).

• Prongs may loosen with wear. We recommend having the prongs inspected at least every two years to ensure the diamond remains secure.

Solitaire Accent (Side Stones)


A close relation of the solitaire ring, the solitaire accent (side stones) engagement ring is a solitaire ring with side stones that flank the center diamond. The side stones add brilliance to the center stone, adding an enriched appearance to the diamond ring.

Most diamond shapes are suitable for the center diamond of a solitaire accent ring. However, the most common are radiant, cushion, emerald, asscher, princess, and round cut stones. The shape of the accent stones depend on the shape of the center stone in the ring. The most common side stone shapes are triangle, taper, half-moon and trapezoids.

A solitaire sccent ring is best suited for those seeking a solitaire ring but with a bit more flamboyance.

Pave Engagement Ring


A pave setting, pronounced "pa-vay," originates from the French word "to pave", as in paved with diamonds. In a pave setting, small diamonds line the band. The metal prongs or beads that hold the diamonds in place are barely visible. Diamonds are pave set when they're as small as .01-.02 carats. Diamonds smaller than that are considered micro pave. A pave engagement ring is encrusted with very small diamonds all along the band to give the appearance of a solid diamond surface.

Because pave set diamonds use only tiny beads or prongs to hold them in place, very little of the metal band shows through and the diamonds appear to be free standing. Pave settings can either go around the whole band (full pave) or stop halfway around it (half pave). Micro pave rings are even more delicate and intricate than regular pave settings. The individual stones are so small that they appear to blend together and create extraordinary fire. Typically, round brilliant or princess cut diamonds are used as center stones in pave engagement rings. Most center stones are prong set, basket set or bezel set. A jeweller typically drills holes into the band and carefully places the small diamonds into the holes. Tiny beads or mini prongs are formed around each diamond to secure them in place. With a pave ring, the effect is one of continuous sparkle.

A pave setting, is a stunning choice for someone with an elegant, timeless style. The intricate detail of the additional diamonds adds depth and grandeur to the ring. Opting for a pave setting ensures you have extra personality, without distracting from the center diamond. The best part of a pave ring? It pairs well with other types of settings, like solitaires, halos and three stone rings. No matter the style you want, you can almost always add pave detailing.

Pros and Cons of a Pave Setting


In addition to choosing a setting that matches the style of your significant other, you want to ensure it fits their lifestyle and is relatively easy to maintain. Review the pros and cons of a solitaire setting below before making your final decision:

Pros


• Brings attention to the center stone.

• Adds to the ring's overall brilliance and beauty.

• Offers extra sparkle to a lower set or less sparkly center stone.

• Designs are available in a modern or vintage style.

Cons


• Sizing and resizing can be difficult if the ring is pave set around the full band.

• Although highly unlikely, there is minimal risk of losing side stones.

Channel Set Engagement Ring


A channel setting provides a diamond ring with additional sparkle and personality. No matter the Diamond Shape, a channel setting is beautiful and securely holds the diamonds. Channel set engagement rings feature side diamonds that are embedded into the channel groove of the ring. A thin strip of metal secures the diamonds in place, no prongs are used. The diamonds are flush with the band and as a result, channel set rings are sturdier than other designs and less likely to snag on clothing. Channel settings are available in gold and platinum, with a variety of diamond shapes and cuts. When it comes to picking the right channel stones for your channel ring, princess cut is a popular choice, as its square edges ensure no gaps between the stones.

A channel setting is similar to a pave setting but uses thicker metal to secure the diamonds that line the band. Because there are no prongs holding the stones, the setting is a snag free design. Channel settings often have center stones, but can also be made solely of smaller stones. A channel setting is a secure way to set smaller diamonds into the band creating a sparkling row that's flush with the shank. The smaller diamonds are set closely together in the grooves of the channel. A channel setting adds visible style and sparkle to your ring. Because of the additional diamonds, a channel setting tends to draw more attention than a solid band. Channel settings are also popular for wedding bands and stackable rings that feature smaller stones without a center stone.

Pros and Cons of a Channel Setting


In addition to choosing a setting that matches the style of your significant other, you want to ensure it fits their lifestyle and is relatively easy to maintain. Review the pros and cons of a solitaire setting below before making your final decision:

Pros


• Securely holds diamonds and protects them from outside forces.

• Enhances the ring's sparkle with side stones.

• Maintains a sharp design without losing stability.

• Is unlikely to snag on clothing and other materials.

Cons


• Often requires more time and effort to clean (dirt can become trapped in the channels).

• Can sometimes hide diamonds slightly more than prong settings.

• Can be challenging to repair and resize due to the numerous channels (it's possible the channels will become bent or misaligned, or that the side stones will loosen during the repair process).

Tension Set Engagement Ring


Tension engagement rings are a modern engagement ring setting in which a diamond is held in place by the physical force of the setting, without any prongs. In a tension ring, the diamond appears to be floating in air. As the name suggests, tension rings use the force and tension of the ring to push against the diamond to hold it in place. Tension cut engagement rings are some of the most secure engagement rings around as the whole ring works to hold the diamond in place even tighter than prong settings. Since tension cut engagements rings show off the entire diamond, the shape and cut of the diamond is extremely important. Round, princess, and emerald cut diamonds are popular choices for tension set rings.

In a tension setting, the tension of the metal band secures the diamond in place. As a result, the diamond appears suspended between the two sides of the shank. With the help of lasers to calibrate the exact dimensions of the diamond, the jeweller expertly cuts tiny grooves into the sides of the band or shank, so the diamond is literally held by the pressure of the custom metal band pushing into the sides of the stone. But tension settings go beyond just those that use the suspension to hold the diamond in place. Tension style settings offer a comparable look but are less expensive and complicated to make. The tension style settings also add an extra dose of security since a prong or bezel setting anchors the stone firmly in place either on the side or underneath the diamond.

Tension settings and tension style rings are popular for engagement rings because they feature a unique design. Whether the diamond is held by suspension or simply looks like it does, it creates immediate appeal and intrigue. Because not much metal surrounds the diamond, like in other settings, the diamonds in tension engagement rings reflect more light, offering more brilliance and sparkle. With a modern feel and a custom made setting, tension engagement rings are special and unique. Whether it's a princess cut pave ring or a tension engagement ring with bezel support, it'll be a keepsake for years to come. Almost any diamond shape can function within a tension setting, but these settings often work best with round cut and princess cut diamonds. The secure support and modern feel of tension settings make them a stylish choice no matter the type of precious metal.

Pros and Cons of a Tension Setting


Every setting style has its advantages and disadvantages. Because the tension setting is a unique design, review the pros and cons before making your final decision:

Pros


• Holds the diamond securely in place.

• Enhances light reflection (brilliance and fire), due to minimal metal surrounding the diamond.

• Offers a unique appearance.

• Involves less maintenance than prong settings.

• Features a modern, stylish look.

Cons


• Often expensive and difficult to resize.

• May cause a small Carat weight diamond to appear smaller, especially when thick metal is used.

• Although highly unlikely, there's a possibility the stone could become loose if an extreme pressure from an outside force strikes a tension setting.

Halo Engagement Ring


Halo engagement ring settings feature a center gemstone surrounded by smaller, micro pave diamonds. The smaller diamonds give the appearance of size and volume to the center stone, adding to the ring's overall sparkle. Traditional halo engagement rings are a more modern take on the classic solitaire ring, while vintage style halo rings focus on the micro pave and milgrain detailing along the band. Halo engagement rings come in all shapes and sizes of center stones. Some feature round stones, asscher cut diamonds, pear shaped and oval diamonds. Halo rings often feature colored gemstones, like blue sapphires or red rubies. A double halo setting, as the name implies, consists of two concentric circles of gemstones that circle the center stone.

Some choose a halo ring because the surrounding stones boost the appearance of the center diamond. The sparkle of a larger stone can be created with a smaller center diamond and a halo making it an appealing option for those with a tighter budget.

Pros and Cons of a Halo Setting


Every setting has its advantages and disadvantages. Halo rings are beautiful choices in many shapes and designs. The following list can help you decide if it's the right style for you:

Pros


• Boosts the size and appearance of the center diamond.

• Smaller stones enhance the rings overall sparkle.

• Securely holds and protects the center stone.

• Complements a variety of diamond shapes.

• Options are available to personalize the setting with colored gemstones.

Cons


• Smaller stones may become loose over time.

• Resizing can be difficult with a pave halo ring due to the small stones in the band.

Halo Accent


Diamond rings with a combined style of accent side stones and a halo setting are classified as halo accent rings. They can be set with any accent side stones, such as taper, triangle, half-moon and trapezoids. Only, the center stone will be surrounded with diamond in a Pave setting.

Vintage Engagement Rings


Vintage engagement rings offer the beauty and intricate craftsmanship of vintage rings with the sturdy and lasting design techniques of modern engagement rings. Vintage style engagement ring designs often draw inspiration from various time periods and contain diamonds with modern diamond cuts, which maximize fire, brilliance, and light reflective properties. Most diamond cuts are used as center stones for vintage rings. In vintage rings, center stones are usually prong set, basket set or bezel set. Vintage engagement rings can be designed to fit the exact style of the one you love.

Vintage settings mirror the styles of the Edwardian, Victorian and Art Deco time periods. These antique styles often feature beautiful intricacies. Milgrain and filigree are two popular techniques used to create additional detail in the settings:

Milgrain - engraving is an embellishment that gives the ring an "antique" look with tiny metal balls decorating the sides of the band and the crown of the ring. This infinity halo ring, for example, features milgrain around the edges of the halo.

Filigree - is another kind of delicate metalwork that features metal beads or twisted metal threads throughout the setting. The antique engagement ring below showcases an example of yellow gold filigree embellishments on the shank and around the bezel set diamond.

Vintage style engagement rings are eye catching because of their unique design, intricate details and classic look. As a timeless piece of jewellery, a vintage engagement ring is well cherished and often passed down for generations. You can even personalize vintage engagement rings to fit the exact style and desires of the wearer. Simply put, they stand out from the crowd. From a gorgeous floral starburst to a fancy milgrain design, the options are truly endless. Vintage rings can also be made with any precious metal: yellow gold, white gold, platinum or rose gold.

Pros and Cons of a Vintage Setting


A vintage style ring provides immense beauty and unique details. Before making your purchase, review the pros and cons to see if it's the right option for you:

Pros


• Provides remarkable beauty and character.

• Enhances the prominence of the center stone when well designed.

• Matches a time period or personal style preference.

• Unique and intricately built.

Cons


• Can require more cleaning and maintenance due to intricate details and crevices.

• The setting can distract from the beauty and sparkle of the stone (if poorly designed).

• With an actual vintage setting (different than a new vintage style ring), additional time and expertise is necessary to ensure it's well maintained and securely holds the diamond.

Wedding Set Engagement Rings


Wedding sets include a matching engagement ring and wedding ring that often complement one another and are visually consistent. Typically, the band is presented at the ceremony, while the engagement ring is given during the proposal. When purchasing rings separately, it can become difficult to precisely match the wedding band to the engagement ring, especially if the ring's design is unusual, highly intricate, or ornamental. Wedding sets, however, ensure a perfect structural and stylistic match between an engagement ring and a wedding ring. Another advantage of wedding sets is that they are often coordinated to a groom's wedding ring. Wedding sets come in classic solitaire settings or include diamonds. This also allows men to be more creative and personal in their own choice of a wedding band.

Three Stone Engagement Rings


Three stone settings offer both personality and additional sparkle. With the ability to create an original design, a three stone ring is a beautiful, unique choice. Three stone engagement rings consist of a center diamond flanked by two side diamonds, which accentuate the size and brilliance of the center diamond.The center stone is usually set higher to complement the side stones and add depth to the ring. Round or princess cut diamonds are the most popular choices for center stones. Most center stones are prong set, basket set or bezel set, as these settings effectively distinguish the center diamond from the setting.

Indicated by its name, three diamonds or gemstones are set closely together in this type of setting. The stones can be the same size or the center stone may be the largest. You can design three stone settings with any type of precious metal: white gold, yellow gold, platinum or rose gold. You can also pair a three stone design with another type of setting, like a pave band or a channel setting. The numerous options available with three stone rings make them a popular choice for engagements.

The three stone setting is a unique and versatile setting. The three stones, set closely together, are said to symbolize the couple's past, present and future. Not only are you creating a ring that's beautiful, but meaningful as well. Many people choose a three stone setting because they can personalize it. You have the option to choose similar sized diamonds, diamonds of different shapes and sizes, or colorful side stones like emeralds, rubies and other birthstones.

Pros and Cons of a Three Stone Setting


A three stone setting is a beautiful choice. There are, of course, advantages and disadvantages to every ring style. Review the pros and cons below to determine if a three stone engagement ring is right for the one you love:

Pros


• Offers a large amount of sparkle and brilliance.

• Allows for multiple larger stones (including ones of different colors).

• Enhances the appearance of the center stone when paired properly with side stones.

• Can achieve a greater surface area of gemstone or diamonds than a singular setting.

• Gives options for personalizing the ring.

Cons


• Requires more cleaning and maintenance than a single stone design.

• When stones are poorly paired, the side stones can overpower or distract from the beauty of the center stone.

Bezel Engagement Ring


Bezel settings provide a secure and stylish design for engagement rings. From a beautiful round cut to a stunning princess cut in white gold, plenty of designs are available. Review the pros and cons of a bezel setting to see if it's right for you. A bezel setting holds a diamond with a custom made thin metal rim. Rather than prongs, the metal encircles the diamond or gemstone and holds it securely in place. Bezel designs can be full or partial. A full bezel completely surrounds the diamond. A partial bezel, leaves the sides open. Both a half and full bezel will securely hold your diamond in place. Overall, bezel engagement rings embody a modern look with their smooth design, but can still have a vintage flair.

The bezel is a popular ring setting due to its modern look and suitability for an active lifestyle. By tightly holding the diamond in place with its custom fit metal, the bezel is one of the most secure settings. For athletes and people with hands on jobs (like doctors, nurses and construction workers), the bezel setting offers stability without sacrificing on beauty. A bezel ring showcases the stunning nature of this setting, along with the durability needed for an active lifestyle.

Pros and Cons of a Bezel Setting


Choosing a setting style often comes down to personal preference and style. You'll also want to make sure the ring fits the lifestyle of the wearer. Review the pros, cons and maintenance details of a bezel setting before making a final decision:

Pros


• Holds the diamond more securely than a prong setting.

• Offers a sleek, modern look.

• Is an excellent ring choice for active careers and lifestyles.

• Easy to maintain and clean (i.e. no prongs to routinely check).

• Doesn't snag on clothing and other materials.

• Protects the diamond from damage.

Cons


• Often hides more of the diamond than a prong setting which can reduce the sparkle of the diamond.

• Provides less light reflection and brilliance than a prong setting.

Bar Setting Engagement Ring


Bar settings are popular styles for engagement rings, wedding rings and eternity bands. The diamonds are secured in place with vertical metal bars, allowing ample light to pass through the stones. With a bar setting, you can choose from a range of styles, like a stunning ring with seven diamonds or a tapered baguette engagement ring. Bar settings secure diamonds on two sides with vertical metal bars, leaving ample space for light to pass through the diamonds. While bar settings are similar to channel settings, they leave the diamond exposed on two sides. A bar setting can compliment a beautiful engagement ring or stand alone for an impressive wedding band or stackable ring. Because of their secure design, bar settings often feature multiple diamonds or gemstones.

A bar setting provides stability while still allowing adequate light to pass through the diamond. In other words, bar settings are stunning yet secure. Bar set rings also create beautiful symmetry, especially in eternity rings and three stone designs. You can pair a bar set wedding band with an engagement ring for a dynamic duo. Some engagement rings even feature unique bar set elements. Bar settings can support a range of diamond shapes, although round diamonds and baguettes are the most common. When choosing a bar set ring, consider whether you prefer rose gold, white gold, yellow gold or platinum.

Pros and Cons of a Bar Setting


Each setting style comes with its advantages and disadvantages. Review the pros and cons of bar settings below to learn about the style features, maintenance requirements and ease of cleaning:

Pros


• Functions as a simple band, stackable ring or center stone design.

• Offers more visibility to diamonds than a channel setting (due to less metal).

• Holds diamonds securely in place with metal bars.

• Provides additional sparkle because stones are more exposed.

Cons


• Slightly higher chance of chipping due to stones being less protected by metal.

• Resizing can be costly or challenging.

• Slightly less secure than a channel setting.

Cathedral Setting Engagement Ring


Cathedral settings are beautiful engagement rings with unique characteristics and classic lines. From a stunning solitaire cathedral ring to a cathedral channel set, a variety of designs are available. Choose a cathedral ring that matches the style of your fiance to be. A cathedral setting mimics the graceful arches of a cathedral building. The metal arches hold the diamond or another gemstone securely in place. Cathedral engagement rings can be set with prongs, a bezel setting or a tension setting. The defining characteristic of a cathedral ring is not how the diamond is held but rather how it's mounted with arches above the rest of the shank.

Cathedral settings are elegant, classic engagement rings. The arches add extra height making the center stone appear larger and more prominent. Due to their ornate design, cathedral settings are often a cost saving style as there's little need to buy additional diamonds or features. Many choose a cathedral setting because they're gorgeous, timeless and not too decorative. A cathedral setting, for example, accentuates the center diamond without overpowering the ring's design. If you're looking for a unique yet simple style, the cathedral setting might be best for you. While cathedral settings can be designed for any Diamond Shape, they most commonly feature round, princess and cushion cut diamonds. In addition to choosing your diamond's shape, decide on additional features, like a pave band or milgrain detailing.

Pros and Cons of a Cathedral Setting


Ensure that the engagement ring you choose fits her style and her lifestyle. Review the pros and cons of a cathedral setting before making a final decision:

Pros


• Highlights and accentuates the center stone.

• Offers an elegant, eye catching design.

• Adds height and character with minimal expense.

• Makes the center stone appear larger and more prominent.

• Secures the diamond or center gemstone.

Cons


• May snag on furniture, clothing and other materials (if high set).

• Requires more time and effort to clean due to the number of crevices.

• Less streamlined than other styles like the bezel setting.

• If poorly designed, the curved features can distract from the center stone's beauty.

Cluster Setting Engagement Ring


Cluster settings offer extraordinary style: they form the appearance of a larger stone with a cluster of smaller diamonds. Cluster engagement rings often feature unique shapes. In a cluster setting, smaller diamonds are set closely together to resemble a larger diamond. A cluster ring can contain a large center stone or a group of stones of equal size. The diamonds in a cluster ring often form a geometric shape like a square or a unique design like a flower or starburst.

Cluster engagement rings often receive plenty of attention. The smaller stones compliment each other and offer extra sparkle. The additional character and style of a cluster ring make them a popular choice for those seeking a unique design. Cluster settings also tend to carry an antique or vintage feel. In other words, cluster rings are timeless and can be passed down for generations. Cluster settings usually feature round diamonds, as they're the most common shape in the smaller carat weights. Round diamonds are also easy to group together to form other shapes. With cluster engagement rings, the designs range from extravagant to simple and classic.

Pros and Cons of a Cluster Setting


Ensure that the engagement ring you choose fits her style and her lifestyle. Review the pros and cons of a cathedral setting before making a final decision:

Pros


• Offers a unique look full of dimension and texture.

• Gives the appearance of a larger center stone.

• Can be designed to form a festive shape, like a flower or sunburst.

• Provides a lower cost option to purchasing a larger diamond.

• May complement smaller hands and fingers.

Cons


• Usually requires more time and effort to clean due to multiple stones and crevices.

• Smaller stones may become loose and fall out if not properly maintained.

Split Shank Engagement Ring


Split shank settings add character to an engagement ring with two slender shanks stemming from the center stone. From designs like a split shank halo to a marquise splint shank ring, the beauty of this setting is endless. In an engagement ring, the shank refers to the band or part of the ring that encircles your finger. Almost all shanks are round, but there are square shaped shanks and other more creative shapes, too. A split shank is a ring in which the shank splits into two, creating two separate metal pieces that stem from the center stone. A range of styles and variations of split shank settings exist. As long as there are two shanks originating from the center stone, it's considered a split shank ring.

A split shank setting offers something extra: sophistication and symmetry. The two shanks leading up to the diamond add character and make the diamond the central focus. The split shank design is fluid and stunning for various diamond shapes and setting colors. Many split shank rings are designed with a halo (a circle of diamonds around the center stone) and pave detailing (smaller diamonds edging the shanks). These additional diamonds add sparkle and style to the ring. Split shank settings can be crafted for any diamond shape because of their secure design. The beauty of two shanks often compliments a range of styles, from round cut to princess cut rings.

Pros and Cons of a Split Shank Setting


Want to know if a split shank setting is right for you or your fiance-to-be? Review the pros and cons below to learn about the advantages and disadvantages of this ring style:

Pros


• Features additional surface area for side stones and sparkle.

• Offers a unique, attention grabbing appearance.

• Leads the eye toward the center stone, making the diamond more noticeable and prominent.

• Can be designed in either a classic or modern look.

Cons


• Requires more cleaning than simpler settings.

• May not be as practical for those who do frequent work with their hands.



Make The Purchase


Your buying experience is best when it's pressure-free. Plan ahead so you have ample time to learn about diamond quality and the characteristics that influence its price.

Shop around and price compare to find the best value in your price range. Certified diamonds that come with an independent, unbiased grading report from the GIA, AGSL or IGI allow you to compare stones with similar carat weight and quality characteristics.

Understand your jeweller's return policy and adherence to the Kimberley Process before making your final decision.

You should also look for diamonds that are procured from authorized sources and validated through the Kimberley Process, an international certification process that uses strict requirements to control the production of rough diamonds and prevent illicit stones from entering the legitimate diamond trade. Additionally, loose diamonds should be graded by the world's most respected grading entities, including the GIA (Gemological Institute of America), the AGSL (American Gemological Society Laboratories), and the IGI (International Gemological Institute), so you and your fiancee can feel confident about both the social responsibility and the quality of your purchase.

Insure Your Ring


The last step before slipping the ring onto your beloved's finger is to have it insured. While the grading report for your stone offers a significant amount of information about the characteristics of your diamond, you'll want to have.

Ring Size


While it's easy enough to have a ring adjusted if you don't get it the right size the first time, it adds a special something if your intended can wear it right after your proposal! Please see our Ring Size guide if you don't know your partners ring size. Alternatively you can take one of her existing rings to a local jewellers to check.

If this isnt an option, try asking a friend or relative if they know her ring size. And if they don't know, don't despair - try (carefully!) measuring the diameter of your partner's ring finger with a piece of string while she's asleep.