Colorless Diamonds > Oval Cut

Oval Cut
Oval Cut
Oval Cut Diamond Ring
Oval Cut Diamond Ring.


Oval Cut Diamond


The ever flattering oval shape is symmetrical and exhibits a similar fire and brilliance to round shaped diamonds. A scintillating twist on the classic round brilliant, the elongated shape can create the illusion of larger size. Oval diamonds are highly versatile, remarkably elegant, and distinctive.

Created by Lazare Kaplan in the 1960's, oval diamonds are a modified brilliant cut (like virtually all round cuts). Because the two shapes possess a similar fire and brilliance, the oval is an ideal choice for a customer who likes the look of a round diamond, but wants something more unique. The slender shape can also make the finger of the wearer appear longer and slimmer, an effect often desired.

Oval Cut Diamonds


The Basics


Somewhere in between the round brilliant and the pear shape


Oval Cut Diamond Basics


Oval Cut Quick Guide


Unique Features

Symmetrical, elongated rounded shape

Facets

Usually 58

L/W Ratio

Typically 1.33-1.66

Origin

19th Century

Expert Tip

Optimises carat weight and elongates finger




Features



Oval Cut Diamond Features

The oval cut is a rounded shape typically comprised of 58 facets with a typical ratio between 1.33 and 1.66.

Somewhere in between the round brilliant and the pear shape,the oval cut is the perfect choice if you are wishing to savour the sparkle of the round brilliant in a slightly rarer and more elongated form.

A "bow-tie effect" occurs when light passing through the diamond casts a shadow across the central facets of the stone. This shadow can be reduced by altering the depth of the pavilion, and adjusting the angles of the table and facets to better diffuse light in the central area. This effect also occurs in the pear, marquise and heart shapes.

Expert Advice


Ratio is an important aspect to consider with the oval shape as it can have a significant impact on both the light dispersion within the stone and the appearance of the finger. When selecting an oval shape it is important to reconcile the relative benefits of the longer shape (larger ratio) and the more rounded shape (smaller ratio). The former will better elongate the finger, while a more rounded shape will better prevent the bow-tie effect.

Preferences vary on how narrow or fat an oval cut diamond should be, so choose what appeals to you personally (though a length to width ratio of 1.35 - 1.50 is considered the classic oval cut). A slightly thinner cut may look most appealing in a setting where the diamond is flanked by side stones.

The chart below serves as a general guideline for evaluating the cut of an oval diamond:

Oval Diamond - Cut Guide



Oval Cut Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor
Depth % 58 to 64 57 to 66 56 to 68 46 to 71 >46 or <71
Table % 55 to 62 53 to 64 52 to 65 50 to 70 >50 or <70
Symmetry Good to excellent Good to excellent Good to excellent Fair to Excellent Poor to Excellent
Polish Good to excellent Good to excellent Good to excellent Fair to Excellent Poor to Excellent
Girdle Very Thin - Sl Thick Very Thin - Sl Thick Very Thin to Thick Very Thin to Very Thick Ex. Thin to Ex. Thick
Culet None Very Small Small Medium > Medium
L/W Ratio 1.35 to 1.50 1.30 to 1.55 1.25 to 1.60 1.20 to 1.65 > 1.20 or < 1.65


Evaluating color in oval diamonds is subjective. Keep in mind that many buyers may actually prefer the ever so slightly warmer colors of a G-H diamond over the cool colorlessness of a D-F diamond. In fact, most of the premium in price associated with oval diamonds at the higher end of the color scale is driven by supply and demand; customers want the D-F color grades, and are willing to pay a premium to get them. In a world without diamond color grading, the price premium for higher grades would be much lower, as the actual differences in color are difficult to perceive. The color chart below provides a general guide for evaluating color in oval diamonds:

Oval Diamond - Color Guide



Oval Cut Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor
< .50 ct. D - G H - I J - K L - M > M
.51-1.0 ct. D - F G H - I J - K > K
1.0-2.0 ct. D - F D - F G - H I - J > J
> 2.0 ct. D - F D - F G H - I > I
Fluorescence None Faint - Med Strong Very Strong Very Strong


Like color, evaluating clarity in oval diamonds is subjective. GIA provides excellent help with their clarity grades. Still, it is important to understand that each customer will have a unique standard for clarity. Some may be perfectly comfortable with an inclusion as long as they cannot easily see it. Others may insist on a more technically flawless appearance. The clarity chart below provides a general guide for evaluating clarity in oval diamonds:

Oval Diamond - Clarity Guide



Oval Cut Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor
< .50 ct. FL - VS2 SI1 - SI2 I1 I2 > I2
.51-1.0 ct. FL - VS1 VS2 - SI1 SI2 I1 - I2 > I2
1.0-2.0 ct. FL - VVS2 VS1 - VS2 SI1 - SI2 I1 > I1
> 2.0 ct. FL - VVS2 VS1 - VS2 SI1 SI2 > SI2


History & Background



Although oval shaped diamonds were first introduced over 200 years ago, the modern oval cut was invented in the early 1960s by leading Russian cutter Lazare Kaplan. The cut eventually earned him a place in the Jewellers International Hall of Fame, however, Kaplan also left his mark on the diamond industry with his unique ability to split a rough diamond into smaller stones with a single blow. This process is known as cleaving.

When a rough material is poorly shaped or contains defective flaws that prevent it from being turned into a single stone, it must be split along the grain. Kaplan became famous for his expertise in taking stones that were otherwise deemed unworthy and transforming them into beautifully cut diamonds.

Oval Cut Diamond History